Making the Summer Grade

by Graham Edwards

Cinefex 160 Banner

What do Solo: A Star Wars Story, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, Ant-Man and the Wasp and Deadpool 2 have in common? Well, for a start, they’re all featured in our summer issue, Cinefex 160, out mid-August and available to preorder now.

The films have more in common than we realized, actually, as Blackmagic Design told us recently. Three of the four were graded by digital imaging technicians using the same DaVinci Resolve Studio software. Talking about his work on Deadpool 2, EFILM senior colorist Skip Kimball commented:

“The biggest challenge in balancing the look of Deadpool 2 was to seamlessly integrate a high volume of visual effects shots that came in from many different vendors. The footage was shot over many weeks at various stages and locations, so my aim was to make sure everything was kept fluid and cohesive. For example, the convoy scene is 10 minutes of action, but elements were shot on bluescreen and on location during different times of day. It took many external mattes combined with Power Windows, along with Resolve plugins like camera shake, blurs and many tricks to make it all come together.”

Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) takes charge while Domino (Zazie Beetz) looks on. "Deadpool 2" photograph courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox.

Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) takes charge while Domino (Zazie Beetz) looks on. “Deadpool 2” photograph courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox.

Kimball worked closely with director of photography Jonathan Sela to create the final grade, acknowledging the fact that while Deadpool frequently dips his mercenary toe into the world of the X-Men, the two franchises have very different looks.

“I’ve worked on several previous films with Jonathan,” said Kimball. “His work is so even and straightforward, and I’m able to get what he exposed on the screen fairly quickly, which is a testament to his craft. The look for Deadpool 2 has less contrast, is a bit softer, and is not as saturated, which all serves Jonathan’s vision.”

Commenting on his overall approach to the colorist’s craft, Kimball added:

“I basically start from scratch as I look at the footage, and color grade based on instinct. I try to start off with being able to show the cinematographer what they exposed, and from there we build on it. If I get stuck on a shot, I walk away from it, then come back. The scene is not done until you can play all the way through without stopping.”


Solo: A Star Wars Story benefited from postproduction work by senior colorist Joe Gawler at Harbor Picture Company, with equivalent work on Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom being handled by senior colorist Adam Glasman of Goldcrest.

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