The Shape of Oscar

by Joe Fordham

Guillermo del Toro poses with both the Oscar® for best picture and achievement in directing for work on “The Shape of Water” at the Governors Ball following the live ABC Telecast of The 90th Oscars® at the Dolby® Theatre in Hollywood, CA on Sunday, March 4, 2018. Photograph by Nicholas Agro / A.M.P.A.S.

Guillermo del Toro poses with both the Oscar® for best picture and achievement in directing for work on “The Shape of Water” at the Governors Ball following the live ABC Telecast of The 90th Oscars® at the Dolby® Theatre in Hollywood, CA on Sunday, March 4, 2018. Photograph by Nicholas Agro / A.M.P.A.S.

The Shape of Water did an amazing thing last night. Although some might argue it is more a romantic adult fantasy, rather than a horror film, it is the first time a monster movie has won ‘best picture’ and ‘best director’ at the Academy Awards.

Not even The Exorcist did that, although it was nominated for seven Oscars, and won for ‘best adapted screenplay’ and ‘best sound mixing’. Typically, genre films only win in ‘below the line’ or technical craft categories. And the genre has included significantly talented filmmakers, Francis Coppola, Roman Polanski, Steven Spielberg, Stanley Kubrick, Alfred Hitchcock, David Cronenberg, George Romero, Ridley Scott, Richard Donner, James Cameron, Peter Jackson, Tim Burton and John Landis to name a few. James Whale, who directed two of Universal’s most enduring horror classics, Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein in 1931 and 1935, was never nominated. Many more have been ignored, or set aside as second class cinematic citizens.

The last borderline monster movies to receive Oscar’s big awards were Jonathan Demme’s 1991 grisly and terrific thriller The Silence of the Lambs, which won Jodie Foster ‘best actress,’ and Darren Aronofsky’s 2010 disturbing psychodrama Black Swan, which performed similarly, nominated in top categories, and winning Natalie Portman ‘best actress’ award. But neither are considered true genre entries.

1931’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde won Frederic March ‘best actor,’ tied with Wallace Beery for The Champ. And Bette Davis won ‘best actress’ for the modern gothic melodrama Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? in 1962. Rosemary’s Baby won ‘best adapted screenplay’ in 1962, similar to this year’s Get Out, which is another notable achievement for the genre. But other than that, out-and-out monster movies have been Oscar pariahs. The original King Kong, although it inspired so many filmmakers and resides on the National Film Registry, did not receive a single AMPAS nomination, technical or otherwise.

So, bravo, Guillermo, on breaking the glass ceiling. We know you eat, breathe and dream monsters for a living, so it is fitting that you have carried the torch for all outsiders and children of the night. Let’s see what you’ve got next.

The Shape of Water in Cinefex

Cinefex covered The Shape of Water in issue 156, published December 2017 and available to purchase from our online store. Our lavishly illustrated article includes interviews with Guillermo del Toro, Doug Jones, the teams at Legacy Effects and Mr. X and special effects supervisor Warren Appleby. In fact, we’ve been chronicling Guillermo’s career for many years, as the links below will testify.